Charged With Aggravated DUI/OWI? Get Legal Help.

In Michigan, all drunk driving charges are serious. Any type of conviction can potentially affect your driving privileges, result in fines and carry other penalties. However, some charges are worse than others. If you are convicted of an aggravated DUI/OWI or operating under the influence of drugs (OUID), you will face even more severe consequences.

The good news is that you have rights, and one of these rights is to have a lawyer fight for you. When you choose me, attorney David G. Moore, you can count on the fact that I will thoroughly investigate all options for reducing the charges you face or even getting them dismissed altogether.

I am a former criminal law prosecutor who understands the intricacies of Michigan law. My mission is to help you craft the strongest defense possible against the drunk driving charges you face. From my office in Kalamazoo, I represent individuals throughout the surrounding areas. Call me today at 269-216-4573.

What Makes Drunk Driving An 'Aggravated' Offense?

Typically, prosecutors in Michigan charge people with aggravated DUI for driving with an unusually high blood alcohol concentration (BAC). If your BAC is more than twice the legal limit (.17 or higher), you may be considered to be "super drunk" and charged with violating the new " Super Drunk Driving" law.

In most cases, aggravated DUI only applies to first-time offenders. If you already got a DUI conviction on your record within the last seven years, you are likely to be charged as a repeat offender.

Drunk driving charges can also be aggravated by factors other than a high BAC. These include driving drunk with a child in the vehicle, driving without car insurance and driving on a suspended or revoked license.

Don't Wait To Get A Free Consultation

Call my Kalamazoo office at 269-216-4573 or toll free at 888-527-6768 to arrange a free initial consultation about your particular situation and find out how I can help. You can also email me. I respond to all messages within 24 hours.